Loose Women: Kaye Adams told she may need hearing aid or cochlear implant following deafness fears 

Loose Women’s Kay Adams, 56, revealed that she has been told her hearing is ‘borderline hearing aid’ in an Instagram post shared on Wednesday. 

Speaking on the photosharing site, the TV star admitted she was feeling ’embarrassed’ over the thought of getting a hearing aid, after she was told she would either need the device fitted or would have to look at cochlear implant.

The Scottish presenter told her 144k followers that she was headed to have her hearing tested and voiced her concerns saying: ‘I absolutely guarantee they are gonna say I need a hearing aid’ before revealing her diagnosis. 

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Shock: Loose Women panellist Kay Adams, 56, revealed that she has been told her hearing is ‘borderline hearing aid’ in an Instagram post shared on Wednesday

Kaye told that she and fellow Loose Women panellist Nadia Sawalha, 56, often have trouble hearing each other.

The talk show host later emerged from her hearing test looking less than happy after she was told that her hearing was ‘borderline hearing aid.’ 

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Speaking on her Instagram story she said: ‘The good news is it is free and the man was really lovely. And he said I have got a lovely set of drums…

‘Um, this was my left ear. My right ear is borderline hearing aid which isn’t so good. All I need now is my piles, my corns, and my hip and I’ll be right as rain’

‘Borderline hearing aid’: Speaking on the photosharing site, the TV star admitted that the news came as no surprise due to her recent difficulties in hearing – meaning she was looking into having an aid fitted and had even looked into cochlear implant

‘A lovely set of drums’: Kaye told that she and fellow Loose Women panellist Nadia Sawalha, 56, often have trouble hearing each other

Kaye tried to laugh off the unfortunate news but later added on a live broadcast: ‘I am a bit embarrassed, I think. I mean glasses are quite cool but there is nothing cool about a hearing aid is there?’

She went on: ‘If I have to get one I have to get one. I actually discussed a cochlear implant but I think that’s a big operation’.

Kay asked her fans their opinions, questioning if there is a stigma around hearing aids and if they would have any doubts about using the devices.

Kaye is often very open with her followers  – later posting that she was going to see if she was eligible for laser treatment on her eyes.

Cochlear implants (pictured) are electronic devices which perform the same action as the inner ear, or cochlea, and transmit sounds through the auditory nerve to the brain

Shock: Kaye tried to laugh off the unfortunate news but later added on a live broadcast: ‘I am a bit embarrassed, I think. I mean glasses are quite cool but there is nothing cool about a hearing aid is there?’ (Kaye pictured in June)

In 2019, it was reported that deaf people could get ‘almost perfect’ quality hearing from a cochlear implant which deconstructs sounds as it hears them.

Researchers are developing a device which they say could significantly improve the quality of what people hear through the hearing aids.

In the UK around 1,200 people have cochlear implants – which essentially connect a microphone directly to the brain to recreate hearing – fitted each year.

But the current technology ‘sounds metallic’ and needs a ‘significant’ amount of brain training to use, according to scientists who claim their device will be better.

Laser eye surgery: The TV personality also went to see if she was eligible for laser eye treatment

HOW DOES A TRADITIONAL COCHLEAR IMPLANT WORK?

Cochlear implants are small hearing devices fitted under the skin behind the ear during surgery.

They have an external sound processor and internal parts, including a receiver coil, an electronics package and a long wire with electrodes on it (an electrode array).

The external processor takes in sound, analyses it and then converts it to signals that are transmitted across the skin to an internal receiver-stimulator, which sends the signals along the electrode array into a part of the inner ear called the cochlea. 

The signal is then sent to the brain along the hearing nerve as normal. 

This means cochlear implants are only suitable for people whose hearing nerves are functioning normally.

The implants cannot restore normal hearing but they can give a deaf person a good representation of sounds, helping them understand speech.

Whereas hearing aids amplify sound so they can be detected by damaged ears, cochlear implants bypass damaged parts of the ear and directly stimulate the auditory nerve.

Signals generated by the implant are sent via the auditory nerve to the brain, which recognizes the signals as sound.

Hearing through an implant is different from normal hearing and takes time to get used to it.

It allows people to recognize warning signals, understand their environment and enjoy conversations with people. 

If a cochlear implant is recommended, it will be inserted into the ear (or both ears) during an operation and switched on a few weeks later. 

Source: NHS Choices 

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