What is cryotherapy? Extreme weight loss method loved by Gemma Collins that freezes flesh

Cryotherapy is one of the latest weight loss treatments being used by celebs, sessions of the freezing treatment can boost your metabolism but it’s also used to treat cancer, skin conditions, injuries and muscle pain

Gemma Collins has revealed to fans that she’s been using freezing cryotherapy treatment to lose weight (Image: INSTAGRAM/GEMMACOLLINS)ByReanna Smith

  • 12:55, 12 May 2022
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Gemma Collins has shared details about how she’s lost weight and taken her fitness routine to the next level.

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Taking to her social media, The Only Way Is Essex star shared a video of her stripping naked and undergoing cryotherapy treatment.

The TV personality danced from foot to foot as she spent a minute in a “minus 180” degrees cryo-chamber.

The freezing therapy treatment has also been used by a host of other celebs, including Katie Price, Rita Ora, Cristiano Ronaldo, Daniel Craig and Jennifer Aniston.

But what exactly is cryotherapy and how does it work? Here’s everything you need to know.

What is cryotherapy?

Gemma Collins has been stripping naked for cryotherapy treatment as part of her weight loss routine
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Image:
INSTAGRAM/GEMMACOLLINS)

Cryotherapy is also known as cold therapy and is a type of treatment in which the body is exposed to extreme cold temperatures for a short period of time.

There are two types of cryotherapy treatment, whole-body and targeted. The type that most celebs have been trying is the whole-body version.

This cryotherapy treatment consists of standing naked or semi-naked in a cryo-chamber that blasts you with cold air.

Temperatures in cryo chambers usually vary between -120 and -150 degrees celsius, but some go as low as -180.

The temperatures are so cold that patients undergoing the treatment can only stay in the chamber for a maximum of four minutes.

Does cryotherapy help you lose weight?

Cryotherapy boosts your metabolism and can help to burn hundreds of calories
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Image:
Getty Images/iStockphoto)

When it comes to weight loss, cryotherapy works by boosting your metabolic rate after your body has been exposed to cold temperatures.

The boost in your metabolism, the theory goes, means that you will burn more calories.

Cryotherapy clinic The CryoBar claims that just one session in a cryotherapy chamber can result in your body burning between 500 and 800 calories.

Cryotherapy can also help you to lose weight by giving you more energy, coming from the release of adrenaline during the treatment.

What else is cryo therapy used for?

Cryotherapy is also used as a form of physio therapy to help heal muscles and is often used by footballers like Gareth Bale
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Image:
Twitter/@GarethBale11)

It’s not just weight loss that cryotherapy is used for, the treatment also comes with many other benefits.

Cryotherapy is used to treat skin conditions, relieve muscle pain, treat chronic pain conditions like arthritis and promotes faster healing of injuries.

The therapy can even be used to treat some types of cancer as the extreme cold temperatures freeze and destroy cancer cells.

Cryotherapy can be a whole-body treatment but it can also be targeted to specific areas of the body for different reasons.

For example, cryotherapy for cancer patients is different to the chamber treatment used by celebs.

For skin cancer patients a doctor could use cryotherapy by putting liquid nitrogen on the area of cancer, and for cancer in the body, they may use something called a cryoprobe which is inserted inside abnormal cells and attached to a supply of liquid nitrogen that then freezes them.

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